Photography competitions

I didn’t devote 2018 to entering photography competitions by any means. However, I did enter five competitions locally in Minnesota, submitting between two and eight each photos each time. While I didn’t earn Grand Prize status, I did receive shared first place in three of the five competitions.

A win is a win!

Three Rivers Park District

I live a block away from Silverwood Park, one of many in the Three Rivers Park District, and started my 2018 photography journey here. I didn’t visit another location so frequently due to it’s proximity to me. The winning photograph actually was the first I had ever taken with my new full frame Sony A7ii. It’s a favorite bending tree during a soft sunset. It was voted as Top Landscape Photo. Check it out.

Silverwood Park
Silverwood Park in Early Autumn

Nine Mile Creek Watershed District

What’s particularly rewarding about winning each of these three contests is that every location has an emotional and memorable place in my life. This second contest is held by the Nine Mile Creek Watershed District. The district ranges from Hopkins to Bloomington and it’s in the south part of the Twin Cities where I often took my dogs on walks, explored the creek nearby 35W and the Minnesota River, sighting owls and snakes, and where I biked the mud and dirt trails.

I was really surprised that out of the eight photos I submitted, the one below was chosen as the winner. And to be honest, I was a little uncertain and borderline embarrassed because I took that photo as I was getting started and certainly had better submissions. Perhaps that was the best January photo submitted! But I’ll take it, and the $10 gift card!

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA
Nine Mile Winter Sunrise

 

Blue Fin Bay

Finally, the third win was the sweetest. Not only because the winning prize was large, and the photo chosen is the second most popular among my family, friends, and fans, but also due to waiting a long time to find out the results. Staying at Blue Fin Bay Resorts has been a family tradition for three years and we’re going back for a multiple night stay next month. The resort is between Tofte and Lutsen along the North Shore. It’s been a treat to stay there because it’s a tradition to look forward to once the holidays are over.


I will also add that I am selling this photo as a metal print starting with the 8×10 size. Please message me or comment for prices and inquiries. I just sold a 16×20 to a friend and it’s been super pleasing to see it hang on the wall.


This photo is also special because it was the best sunset I’d ever seen. And I earned it. It was -20 degrees or so in Grand Marais and I was doing jumping jacks and all sorts of dances trying to stay warm. The sunset reflect all over the ice and was just a glorious moment in 2018.

Enjoy!

Icy Sunset

In case you were wondering about the other two competitions in which I entered, they were TruStone Financial’s annual calendar contest and National Camera Exchange’s travel contest.

My Backyard: Silverwood Park

I had never heard of this park before moving within walking distance just over a year ago. Nestled between St. Anthony and New Brighton, Silverwood Park has become my special treasure. I have no visited another location so frequently to photograph and explore. In fact, the park has served as training ground for all sorts of seasonal and subject shots.

Allow me to share some of my most memorable and significant photographic moments with you since I started shooting there October of 2017.

Silverwood Park

I started late in the month and many of the colors had faded. I tried looking everywhere which meant staring at the ground intently to see what might juxtapose or prove interesting. This really helped me with the creative process, relying on imagination. No leaves were placed outside of where they had fallen!

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA
November’s Leaf Tussle

I woke up one morning and saw the weather report indicate fog in the area. I rushed out the door and to the lake and was rewarded with snaking smoke trails over the lake and fog cover so massive it swallowed up everything in minutes.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA
The Bridge & the Fog

It froze soon afterwards. I discovered a unique time to shoot, one that I am eager to capture again this winter freeze: the cold that builds up ice formations but isn’t hidden by the first snow. Maybe this lasts two weeks, maybe only a few days. Below was one such example, combined with one of the best sunsets of early winter.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA
Ice Rocks

Then soon after, the ice melted some and the moon shimmered on its thin surface. Simply walking around at night afforded this creative shot.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA
Golden Leaf

Since I’m mentioning leaves, November and early December can be tough months to photograph since autumn colors are gone and if snow hasn’t fallen. This forced me to try and be really creative. The below shot is one of my favorites. It’s almost as if the branches, completely bare, had thrown the leaves into their watery grave. You can see the drowned leaves and the two in the corner overlapping, as if in final embrace before their own descent.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA
Leafy Grave

I discovered the method and practiced my first long-exposure shots last winter.  It was a really rewarding experience coming up with this shot. Afterwards, I remarked to myself, “I can do this!” And so I had another technique in my belt.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA
Late Night Movement

Then spring came.

In the picture below, I had been facing west away from the sunrise shooting bright, young green leaves when the sun exploded into the woods. It absolutely light up everything, turning much of the youthful green into yellow flare. As soon as I saw what was happening, I rotated 180 degrees and zoomed in with my 100-300mm lens and captured the golden light. It was one of my favorite photography moments in 2018 and completely spontaneous.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA
Golden Moment

My final shot was taken just a couple of weeks ago. The red was so rich and the flipped around leaf proved an interesting subject with its detail and moisture. It was a metaphor of how rich my photos had grown in a year. There is much to learn and improve upon, but I’ll always remember to be thankful for growth in this wonderful photography journey.

Caught in Red

Most of these photographs were simply the result of being outside with a camera, rather than planning the composition or shot or around weather. I just went outside a lot. I suppose that expresses the free spirit, random, and abstract part of my personality in some ways. Eager to see what the next season reveals!

It’s only been a year.

Scouting Whitewater State Park

Whitewater State Park might be in my top three favorite parks in Minnesota. A huge reason is that the conditions aren’t ideal for pesky mosquitoes due to cold-spring fed water that is constantly moving.

But it’s the bluffs that capture my heart.

Once more, I woke up at 4:30 a.m. and drove two hours to catch a state park sunrise. This morning treated me more colorfully than the visit to St. Croix State Park.

Coyote Point Sunrise

I had hoped that the color would expand into the clouds but it mostly stayed behind the ridge. And yet, it was a gorgeous scene.

After sunrise, I quickly transferred to the eastern Chimney Rock where I watched the sun burn the shadows away.

whitewater6
Chimney Rock View

The five bluffs at Whitewater State Park are close enough to one another to climb all of them in one day. At Chimney Rock, you can view the widest part of the river offering a swimming hole for campers. I love the reflections here.

From here, I went south along the Chimney Rock Trail which bordered farmland and you can see where dried, small gullys zigzag down into the banks of Whitewater River. The sun burst through the trees and illuminated the yellow leaves all over.

whitewater5

Then I discovered Inspiration Point and wonder if it’s my favorite part of the park. It reminded me of the North Shore without Lake Superior.

whitewater2

Whitewater State Park

But of course, it is not the North Shore. It has its own beauty and another reason to love Minnesota and our state parks.

Have you visited?

Autumn Bursts in St. Croix State Park

While I made plans to capture autumn colors this year, I made note of fire towers in state parks and St Croix State Park made the list. It’s about two hours from the Twin Cities, including a slow drive on a dirt road. At the time, the roads were bursting with every fall color.

Autumn Roads in St. Croix

I arrived at the fire tower at 6:45 a.m. after leaving the house two hours earlier.

I climbed slowly.

After climbing a more rickety tower in Grand Portage, Minnesota, this one’s stability helped with my fear of heights. I ended up staying on the top platform for an hour watching and waiting for color. I’ll tell you three tips that really helped me become absolutely (well, mostly) comfortable with fire towers:

  1. Go slowly, and make several stops. Take in the all scenes, bend your knees, and pause, allowing your mind to grow comfortable with the heights.
  2. Stay awhile. This, too, seems counter intuitive, but the more time passes, the more I relaxed. I found my mind went overboard with every creak in the boards, every wind gust, and several movie scenes. I quickly realized how much of my physical responses were from my irrational mind. The more I relaxed and took in deep breaths, the more I felt fine. After an hour at top, I nearly felt as  secure as being on the solid ground.
  3. Climb several towers within a short time of each other. Climbing one in Grand Portage two weeks prior really helped me with the one in St. Croix.

While the clouds didn’t allow much of a sunrise, the trees beneath me were nicely represented in the low, even light.

stcroixblog4
Fire tower view

After climbing down, I started driving back and in the immediate 200 feet or so, stopped my car, got out, and took pictures five times of the wrapping color around the road. Just stunning. I recommend St. Croix State Park for the scenic drives on these dirt roads if nothing else. I even got to see my first wild porcupine cross the road.

Porcupine Crossing

When I entered the park at 6:00am, I couldn’t see any colors but upon exiting, it was red everywhere and colors layered and filled in everywhere. Below is an example of the color burst.

Color burst

I was so enamored with color, I returned with my wife less than twenty-fours later. Shockingly, in that brief time, much color was lost and now lay on the roads and paths. I couldn’t believe how it changed so dramatically after one night. There remained enough color to enjoy the park, but it was a different experience for me and a bit of a letdown since I brought Sarah to enjoy it.

IMG_0015

But we did enjoy all of it.