Spring, You’re Looking Better Every Year

Seriously, though. Spring is more and more endearing to me every year. Yes, the Minnesotan winter takes a toll even on this self-proclaimed lover of ice. Obviously, there is the warm relief spring brings. But I’ve really seen my appreciation grow with greater attention to detail, slowing down and scouting for spring scenes.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA
Blossoming Depth

Photography has really endeared spring to my heart. It’s taken that focus I apply to other photographic subjects or seasons applied to spring that’s enabled me to slow and see the beauty.

It was only last year that I started to see spring’s colors as a reflection of autumn’s colors. The diversity in glowing greens and yellows and other budding colors is very similar to the chorus of autumn color. This, too, has really captivated me this year in particular, especially since this time frame is limited before the solid summer greens take over.

I think another reason I am growing more fond of springtime is its emergence reminds me of a rising sun. I shoot in the morning hours much more than evening hours because I love that day and light are beginning, rather than ending. I think spring has a similar jolt of refreshment when I capture it. I’m seeing growth, new, freshness, color, light and more rather than a period of time’s closing door as darkness settles in the evening, for example.

How are you enjoying spring this 2020?

What If?

I was listening to the LensWork Podcast today, one of the channels that spark creative thought and ideas for blog posts, and it sparked me to comment on this “What if?” question.

Brooks Jensen, host of the podcast, was describing a situation if a photographer imagined a time of shooting not traditionally pursued, or using equipment in a different way, or manipulating a light source used in a different way, what would happen? He remarks that often those attempts in themselves would not produce anything magical and come to a dead end.

But his point that really struck me was the subsequent thoughts and questions, leads and ideas that follow the what if question. For they are the ideas and thoughts, that may have never happened if never attempting a new or innovated technique or plan.

Brooks didn’t elaborate further, but I briefly shall.

As someone who describes himself as an innovator, this message appealed to me. Let’s take an example of what if being put into practice by mentioning Minnehaha Falls, a waterfall in Minneapolis. It’s been photographed from every angle in every season and is on every camera and blog it seems. But, what if? What if there is a new composition no one has tried before? What if no one tried photographing the moonlight over it? What about this particular tree framing it?

I appreciate the what if question because it allows for hope and creativity at locations deemed normal and done. This what if question helped me find a new composition at Minnehaha Falls.

 

What if?