The Four Most Influencing Photographers Since 2017

In this post, I want to identify and thank the following four photographers for influencing me in the last four years with their expertise, passion, and most of all, generosity. Sharing with me equipment, knowledge, secret locations, passion, expertise, time, and so much more.

2017: Bryan Hansel

I first met Bryan on a winter workshop along Lake Superior during February. I had been saving up to participate and my wife said I was crazy to pay money to photograph ice will being on ice and having my entire face frozen. When it comes to winter photography, a little crazy is good. Beyond the shared love for winter photography, the North Shore and Lake Superior, Bryan indirectly encouraged me through his use of a good foreground. No one does that better in Minnesota in my opinion. He really captures unique patterns and leading flows from foreground to background. I also think he is distinct from many other photographers for doing this. I am grateful he showed me to look closely and see beyond what is easily seen.

2018: Jay Rasmussen

If you have read my blog posts before, you may be familiar with Jay’s name as he has been my mentor since 2018. After reviewing my work in early 2018 and not impressed, he reviewed my work again six months later at his home. After critiquing 75 images of my images, he determined I had a chance at selling my work and he began to equip me using his experience and knowledge to start my journey. He became the catalyst ingredient to my passion and practicing and I’m so grateful to his generosity and support. Jay has taught me how to sell, market, and get my name out there and has been the largest influence in the photography journey.

2019: Chris O’Donnell

Chris would be surprised to make this list. But my “astro adventurer” friend, really produced a love for the night skies through inviting me to join him on all night excursions to capture the moon, Milky Way, and on one fortunate occasion, the Northern Lights. He was really patient with me as I learned how to focus on stars, set my iso and create long exposures. He even loaned me a lens which he eventually sold to me. Waterfalls may be my favorite subject to photograph but the night sky is the most fascinating and exhilarating subject. I am always in awe and Chris helped paved the way for me to appreciate it. He’s shown me secret spots and been generous the whole way.

2020: Ernesto Ruiz

I’d say Ernesto has no idea of his influence but the latest is the need to slow down. He has an Instagram hub and website called Slow Movement Photography that really focuses on slowing down and finding quality not quantity. Rather than doing the “run and gun” when it comes to locations, it’s rather about putting the camera down and seeing the scene. Just take it all in and let the entire place, the emotion or the essence of place determine the compositions. Being more of a run and gun type of photographer, who certainly has lots of friends who do this, too, I really want to practice this more. Ironically, the last picture I take at locations often is my best. I believe that is because I have spent the time needed to really understand what the scene is providing me. It’s a challenge for sure, but one I am trying to embrace as often as I can.

To each of you, my gratitude for your influence is matched by the excitement for the future. Thank you.

I don’t Suffer from Creative Block. But Practical Block, Yes.

Someone asked me if I suffer from creative block, like writer’s block, and how I overcome it. In photography, that might mean mental fatigue from seeing all these creative pictures from peers and competitors and being drained and feeling hopeless to produce something fresh. It might mean, there is no spark. No composition is singing to be captured during another great adventure. There are many ways to define creative block.

I don’t suffer from creative block. As someone who researches new places, imagines new compositions, always has plans and enjoys starting multiple projects every year, I just don’t lack in creativity and never have a slump by what most may assume to be a creative slump. At least not yet!

No, for me, I suffer from something else. I just call it practical block.

Sometimes, I refer to it as lazy block. I can know exactly where I want to go. The idea, composition and lighting are in mind, but wow, getting out bed is rough and maybe it will be cloudy, so I’ll stay home. For me practical block comes in when I think of the inconveniences of going out and doing photography:

  • My car doesn’t have enough gas to make the trip without stopping.
  • It’s raining, cloudy or too icy slick for my sedan to make it to the park.
  • I really don’t want to get up at 5:00am.
  • I work at 9:30am plus all the above factors so….nah. Let’s sleep more.
  • I forgot to prepare my clothing, camera gear and snacks the night before.
  • I didn’t get the coffee ready for quick start in the morning.
  • My wife doesn’t want me alarm to wake her earlier than she needs.

Does that make sense? So all these little factors come together and dissuade me from heading out. I’ve also noticed that if I prepare haphazardly, my chances for going out in the morning lower significantly and vice versa.

I will share my advice for getting out of creative block, however, as I can see myself being in that state one day and this advice should be remembered by us both, dear fellow creative.

When you feel creative block, the best thing to do is get back out in the field and practice creativity. For me as a photographer, that means getting out into the landscapes feeling the sun on my cheeks, noticing the perfectly shaped dew drops on colorful leaves, listening to the waves crash on the beach in different strengths, and more. The immersion of what once was passionate produces reminders and excitement back into the blood. Plus for me, being alone in nature has always been refreshing. That and the adventures I am on are all ways to get me excited again. Because I think it’s important when in a slump to get past the feelings in the moment and remember the highs of when we’re on location.

At least, that’s my opinion and method for me.

What’s been your experience for creative block and how you deal with it and try to overcome it?

Photography: “The Shot” or the Story

Do a majority of photographers place more value on finding that one shot than focusing a story?

Does “the perfect shot” tell enough of the story?

Is there room for more story telling in photography from photos that aren’t as popular?

One of the podcasts I listen to is LensWork and I find that Brooks Jensen complements a lot of thoughts I have on photography which in turn, creates posts for my blog. This is one such post.

If you follow me on Instagram you may have seen that I post mini-collections of locations that I photograph. I’ll post “non-sexy” photos with “sexy” photos to reveal an immersive experience to my viewers. All the shots are interesting to me so I don’t just post arbitrarily. For me, it’s about exposing beauty both apparent and subtle, loud and silent, detailed and grand. I personally have a greater connection to the environment when I slow down and take it all in. And my observations then are expressed to the public.

Here is a mini-collection of photos from bluff country in southern Minnesota.

Whether you’re a viewer or a photographer, do you tend to be attracted to or focus on finding that sexy or perfect shot? My example today could be the featured image of the silhouetted barn. Or do you take in more? The collection above really shares the beauty of the area in a way one image cannot. This collection isn’t tight enough, or focuses enough on one specific location like Whitewater State Park, to allow me to say, if I remove one photograph, the story would be incomplete. However, this is a future goal in mind when I do “series photography” again. A goal, is to intimately connect four-to-six images in a way where if I removed one, the viewer would miss out on the story.

Think of the most famous or most liked photographer you know or follow. Do you only know their popular images or can you recall any of the other images that may surround the popular images?

I’ve barely scratched the surface with this topic and will likely post again but let me leave with you with a comparison that is in my mind.

If you listened to the linked podcast called The Rest of the Story, you’ll hear Brooks mention that “we live in the age of the orgasm. That we are only interested in the dessert. Only the headline matters but not the rest of the story.”

What if photography can be like listening to a concept album? There will likely be “orgasmic” tracks or your favorite tracks that you repeat over and over. But there are also layers, interludes, outros, soft and heavy tracks, different emotional pieces as the album progresses through the playlist. If listening carefully, we began to see more than a single hit but a piece of an entire performance. What if the same can be true with photography? Yes, the brilliant sunrise may be the most powerful image. But I’d like to think that the other images make that sunrise more powerful and then put together, are greater still.

I’d appreciate your input as I process this idea and think about it more in my work.

My Creative State

comolakereflection
Como Lake, St. Paul

Welcome

I’m Josh and this blog is about my photographic journey and creativity in the world, mostly in Minnesota. Since I live in the North Star State, I thought it applicable to name this blog after it since it is my creative space on the web. Here, you’ll find nooks, crannies, secret spots, and new treasures in the north star state. My blog will describe these locations, share my thoughts, and of course, post photos from each visit.

Brief About Me

I’m a born-and-raised Minnesotan who loves the North Shore and the southern bluffs. I’ve been shooting on average twice a week since October 2017, focusing on learning, learning, and learning in 2018. I typically capture landscapes, black and white, nature, and macro. Waterfalls are my favorite and I have been called the “Waterfall Guy” before, perhaps out of quantity. You decide about the quality!

When I’m not practicing composition, chasing waterfalls, and visiting state parks, I am grooving to new tunes, playing soccer, watching hockey, camping, and enjoying life with my wife.

I’m hoping to plan a photography trip to Scotland in October of 2019 so stay tuned for that!

Let’s get in touch!

I encourage you follow me on social media and feel free to drop a message! I’m most active on Instagram. Thanks for reading and have a great day!

EI5C1878